Melbourne Daily Photo

Hello, I created this blog because Melbourne is my city and I want people to see what a beautiful place it is. So come with me on a journey of discovery as we traverse the dining precincts, the culture, the laneways and hidden gems that make Melbourne marvellous.




Waltzing Australia

Thursday, 11 March 2010

Charles La Trobe

 
Charles La Trobe

Peter Corlett sculpted this 3 metre high bronze statue of Charles Joseph La Trobe which was unveiled 21st November 2006. It shows La Trobe reading the Proclamation of Separation looking rowards the city and dressed in full uniform.

 
Reading the Proclomation
The statue stands outside the Victorian State Library near La Trobe Street in the CBD.


 
Portrait of Charles Joseph La Trobe (1801 - 1875) by W. A. Hirschmann, 1851. State Library of Victoria.

About La Trobe
Charles Joseph Latrobe was born on 20th March 1801 and was the first lieutenant-governor of Victoria. On 30th September 1839, he arrived in Melbourne with his wife and daughter, a couple of servants and a prefabricated house.

The population of Port Phillip in 1839 was less than 2,000 - when he resigned in 1854 Melbourne was the then richest city in the world with a population of over 76,000. From a small settlement of wattle and daub houses, Melbourne now had a telegraph line, a railway line, gas lighting and the foundation stones had been laid for a public library as well as a university.

Unlike mmany colonial governors, La Trobe had no army or naval training and little or no administrative experience. He was a talented and cultured gentleman with high principles. Melbourne owes a great deal to Charles La Trobe, most of our gardens, national parks and societies we have are the result of his vision.

La Trobe's Cottage

La Trobe's cottage originally stood in Jolimont, but with the passing of time fell into disrepair. It was purchased in 1960 and relocated to King's Domain near the southern entrance to the Royal Botanic Gardens and restored by the National Trust. Many of the original furnishings were found and are on display in the restored cottage.

To get to the cottage, catch the No.8 tram heading south in Swanston Street and get off at stop 21 or 22.

Today's Quote: I am convinced that we shall get more than one strange animal before we have finished - Charles La Trobe 1847.

5 comments:

arabesque said...

very informative, such history, i must admit that i don't know much about australia and everytime i visit your blog, i get tidbit infos about history and stuffs. ^0^

ps: gave you an award, kindly visit my blog anytime. ^0^.

Cezar and Léia said...

He was an important man, this sculpture is beautiful and your post very interesting.
Also that cottage looks a peaceful adorable place, great shot!
Léia

B SQUARED said...

A fitting tribute to a great man.

Rob and Mandy said...

I read somewhere that the french were actually the first in Australia, but decided it wasn't worth a penny? Truth or french lore? Anyway, this guy has a very french name. And who knows, you might be speaking french today!

J Bar said...

He looks splendid.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Melbourne Daily Photo

Hello, I created this blog because Melbourne is my city and I want people to see what a beautiful place it is. So come with me on a journey of discovery as we traverse the dining precincts, the culture, the laneways and hidden gems that make Melbourne marvellous.