Melbourne Daily Photo

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Waltzing Australia

Monday, 25 April 2011

ANZAC Day



Today, the 25th of April is Anzac Day. Ninety-six years ago today, Australian troops landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula.... It was dawn, Sunday the 25th April 1915 when they rushed from the beach up to Plugge's Plateau and into Australian military history, suffering many casualties on the way.
Troops from New Zealand landed at Gallipoli just after midday... Together the Australians and New Zealanders gave birth to the Anzac legend.


ANZAC TRIBUTE
I have put together a collection of original photoshots from the First World War, in honour of the Australian and New Zealand soldiers who gave their yesterday for our tomorrow. Brave men who fought with courage, deternination and gave birth to the legend of the ANZACS. From them came the meaning of mateship and standing by your mates.

This tribute includes the first Anzac Day - the landing at Anzac Cove on Sunday 25th April 1915. Also included are shots of Passchendaele, Ypres, Voormezeele - names steeped in history - marches and photos taken by the soldiers.





The events on this first day set the course of the whole battle, and led to the evacuation of the Anzac troops in December 1915.

Our Diggers
The nickname "Digger" is said to be attributed to the number of ex-gold diggers in the early army units and to the trench digging activities of the Australian soldiers during World War I. The actual origin of the name has been lost in time but the Australian soldier is known affectionately around the world as the Digger.

Above: Anzacs

The legend of ANZAC was born on 25 April 1915, and was reaffirmed in eight months’ fighting on Gallipoli. Although there was no military victory, the Australians displayed great courage, endurance, initiative, discipline, and mateship. Such qualities came to be seen as the ANZAC spirit.

Many saw the ANZAC spirit as having been born of egalitarianism and mutual support. According to the stereotype, the ANZAC rejected unnecessary restrictions, possessed a sardonic sense of humour, was contemptuous of danger, and proved himself the equal of anyone on the battlefield.

Australians still invoke the ANZAC spirit in times of conflict, danger and hardship.


Above: The Last Anzac
Alexander William Campbell, known as Alec was our last surviving Anzac and our last living link with the Anzac landing at Gallipoli and the Aussies who began the Anzac legend. He died on 16th May, 2002 at the grand age of 103 years.

Alec, born in Launceston, Tassie on 26 February 1899, lied about his age when he was 16, so he could join the army without his parents permission. He was so young and hadn't even started shaving and the other men in his battalion knicknamed him "The Kid"





Today's quote: One is left with the horrible feeling now that war settles nothing; that to win a war is as disastrous as to lose one ~ Agathe Christie

4 comments:

Lois said...

Wonderful post to commemorate the day! I like seeing all of the old photos too.

Dianne said...

Loved seeing these photos of the Diggers - and oh! how true is that quote by Agathe Christie.

J Bar said...

Great tribute.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Genie said...

What a wonderful commemorative post to share with those of us so far away. My dad was in WWI in France so I really appreciate the name "ditch diggers.” The collage of the many different men just touched my heart as do the amazing photos of I have of my dad. Thanks so much for such a special post.

Melbourne Daily Photo

Hello, I created this blog because Melbourne is my city and I want people to see what a beautiful place it is. So come with me on a journey of discovery as we traverse the dining precincts, the culture, the laneways and hidden gems that make Melbourne marvellous.